ASK AMY: ‘Best of’ column gets to the meat of the matter | Lifestyles

Susan S. Johnson

Dear Readers: Every year I step away from my column for two weeks to work on other creative projects. (Anyone interested in my non-advicey personal essays and photographs can subscribe to my free newsletter: amydickinson.substack.com).

I hope you enjoy these “Best Of” columns from 10 years ago. Today’s topic: How we eat.

Dear Amy: I have a friend who recently decided to become vegetarian/vegan.

She now shares articles via email and Facebook calling people who eat meat “depraved,” “confused,” and “unethical.”

There was even an article accusing meat eaters of being “species-ist.”

I could care less about her diet,

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Hot topics: Diet and longevity, Racism and depression, chores and heart health, benefits of raw veggies, meat and cancer risk | Health and Medicine

Susan S. Johnson

Altering diet to add a decade

Simply making small changes to one’s diet can add as much as 10 to 13 years to life, according to a new study.

Norwegian researchers found that a 20-year-old woman who replaces refined grains with whole grains and legumes, as well as eats more fish and nuts, is  less likely to develop heart disease and cancer, and can benefit from an additional 10 years of life.

For men, those changes could mean an additional 13 years of life.

The results do not take into account nutritional requirements, but focus more on caloric

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Lab-Grown Food: Meat Without Murder

Susan S. Johnson

In 2022, it’s more common than ever to see the plant-based diet represented in the world of dining. From Impossible Burgers to dairy-free cheese, the sticky, laminated folds of restaurant menus have opened up to the idea of vegan and vegetarian cuisine. Your waiter doesn’t care whether you’re a life-long vegan, kosher or just watching your cholesterol — the reasons behind avoiding animal products are varying, and it’s never mattered less. 

At the same time, recently, issues regarding animal agriculture have received more attention. Environmental impacts, excessive water use, land intensification and health impacts are all areas of

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Can cutting down on meat really lower your cancer risk?

Susan S. Johnson
 (Getty)

(Getty)

A growing number of people are choosing to eat less meat. There are many reasons people may choose to make this shift, but health is often cited as a popular motive.

A large body of research has shown that plant-based diets can have many health benefits – including lowering the risk of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Two large studies – EPIC-Oxford and the Adventist Health Study-2 – have also suggested vegetarian or pescatarian diets (where the only meat a person eats is fish or seafood) may be linked to a slightly

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