Why a meat-free diet boosts health: protein levels might hit the spot : Research Highlights

Susan S. Johnson

Metabolism

An analysis shows that the amino-acid profiles of vegan, vegetarian and omnivorous diets are similar.

Vegetarians, vegans and omnivores end up consuming similar ratios of amino acids, regardless of whether their menus lean more heavily on beef, beans or Greek yogurt — implying that protein type is not responsible for the health benefits of plant-based diets.

Plant-based diets have been linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Vegans and vegetarians tend to eat less protein than meat-eaters, but it’s not clear which aspect of a meat-free diet confers benefits.

Michael MacArthur

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Tips for finding inspiration for a plant-based diet

Susan S. Johnson

Jul. 14—Do you shudder a bit when you hear the phrase “plant-based?” Does it impart thoughts of never eating meat again and feeling pressured to avoid dairy at all costs? You’re in luck, because a plant-based diet offers more flexibility than many might think and it’s not as intimidating as it sounds to start working towards a diet that incorporates higher amounts of ingredients and foods that come from plants instead of animals.

A plant-based diet is not veganism, not even vegetarianism. It is a diet that can range from being mostly to entirely comprised of foods derived from plants

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How Diet Affects My AS

Susan S. Johnson

This is for the “AS Diet People.” You know who you are. You suffered with ankylosing spondylitis until you found a solution with a major diet modification. You have this need to shout it from the rooftop. 

When you suffer day after day, year after year and then you find something that works, you want to shout it from the rooftops. You want to say, “I’m better. I figured ankylosing spondylitis (AS) out. AS was ruining my life and now it’s under control. Look what I can do. I can sleep through the night, I wake up ready

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Ways to Make Your Diet Heart Healthy

Susan S. Johnson

Penny Kris-Etherton, fellow American Heart Association; Registered Dietitian Nutritionist; professor of nutrition, Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA.

Cleveland Clinic: “Obesity and Heart Disease,” “Heart Healthy Power Foods.”

American Heart Association: “Prevention and Treatment of High Cholesterol (Hyperlipidemia),” “Health Threats From High Blood Pressure,” “The Benefits of Beans and Legumes,” “Trans Fats,” “Meat, Poultry, and Fish: Picking Healthy Proteins,” “Know the flax (and the chia): A little seed may be what your diet needs,” “Healthy Cooking Oils,” “The Skinny on Fats.”

American Diabetes Association: “Make your heart work for your blood sugar.”

USDA: “Why is

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